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Lina Marie Stolze

Environmental Controls on Bioturbation Processes in Marine Benthic Habitats

Lina Marie Stolze
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2001-2007 study program “Marine Environmental Sciences” at the Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM), Oldenburg, Germany. Major subjects: Organic Geochemistry, Benthic Ecology. Diploma thesis: “Succession of Marine Fouling Communities – A Contribution to the Development of a Non-Toxic Antifouling”

Sam Bentley

Earth Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland

2008 – present

Ecosystem Function, EF-04: Geological Controls on Marine Benthic Habitat

lmstolze@mun.ca

My project aims to describe and quantify sediment mixing rates (bioturbation) and key geological and geochemical factors that significantly influence these processes at three sampling sites with contrasting climates and bathymetries (Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Labrador Fjords and Gulf of Maine). Bioturbation rates and biological mixing depths are determined by describing the sedimentary fabric and by quantifying the mixing of tracers (radioisotopes: 210Pb, 137Cs, 228Th and 234Th, and chlorophyll-a) within the sediment column. In addition, geological and geochemical characteristics, particularly sedimentation rate, organic matter content and organic matter source will also be analyzed.

The specific project aims are:

    1. description and quantification of bioturbation processes of contrasting benthic habitats
    2. identification of main environmental influences (bioturbation inhibiting/stimulating)
    3. development of map/template showing relationship patterns among environmental factors and bioturbation rates

Within CHONe, correlations among environmental factors and bioturbation processes identified in my study may be useful to predict and interpret effects of natural and anthropogenic environmental alterations on the biological activity of benthic habitats and, thus, may be beneficial for establishing guidelines regarding conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity resources.

 

 

 

 

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