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Melinda Agapito

Melinda Agapito

Tiered GIS-Based Multi-Criteria Decision Approach in MPA Design

I studied Marine Resource Management at Oregon State University. This afforded me the opportunity to appreciate the value of GIS mapping in resource conservation and planning. Prior to that, I had engaged in a land-based conservation project working with local communities in the Philippines.

Renita Aranha

Renita Aranha

Geochemistry, microstructure and growth banding in Stylaster campylecus parageus and Primnoa pacifica - Implications for commonly observed deep sea corals as paleoceanographic archives

Hamed Bagheri

Hamed Bagheri

Strategies for filtering incorrect matches in seabed image mosaicing

Jeff Barrell

Jeff Barrell

Remote sensing of intertidal landscapes for Arctic benthos

Jeff is a PhD candidate at Dalhousie University where he is studying the landscape arrangement of marine habitats using spatial statistics, remote sensing, and GIS methods.

Rénald Belley

Rénald Belley

Benthic macrofaunal biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in contrasting Canadian marine ecosystems

I did my Masters at the Université du Québec à Rimouski with Drs. Philippe Archambault and Bjorn Sundby. Using a benthic camera, I studied the effects of hypoxia on benthic macrofauna and bioturbation traces on the seafloor of the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Michael Brown

Michael Brown

Radiative transfer modelling in an enclosed bay: towards improving coastal satellite remote sensing for habitat mapping

Mike completed his undergraduate degree in 2007 at Cornell University. His research interests include satellite remote sensing and bio-optical oceanography. He also likes to play music and many different sports.

Rachel Brown

Rachel Brown

Genetic Diversity and Connectivity of Glass Sponge Reefs

I completed my BSc in Biology with a minor in Ocean Science at the University of Alberta in 2011. My broad interests lie in deep sea, population connectivity, and community interactions in a changing environment.

Christina Carr

Christina Carr

The Polychaeta of Canada: Exploring diversity and distribution patterns using DNA barcodes

Katrine Chalut

Katrine Chalut

Using the bivalve Portlandia arctica as an indicator of environmental variations within fjords (Labrador, Canada)

I did my undergraduate studies at University of Quebec at Rimouski in marine biology. After completing my BSc in 2011, I started a Master focusing on the Arctic and joined the benthic laboratory at ISMER.

Kayi Chan

Kayi Chan

Effects of an invasive bivalve, Nuttallia obscurata, on biogeochemical cycling in the intertidal

I obtained my BSc with First Class Honours from SFU in 2008. My honours project examined the effect of the economically important Manila clam (Tapes philippinarum) on ammonium flux. I am interested in the effects of marine invasive species on their non-native environments.

Jackson Chu

Jackson Chu

Biological Patterns and Process of Glass Sponge Reefs

A strong empirical foundation of knowledge is required before conservation, management, and policy efforts are successful. My research provides a quantitative baseline for ecosystem based management of the unique glass sponge reefs.

Jackson Chu

Jackson Chu

Responses of epibenthic communities to hypoxia in coastal British Columbia, Canada

Ryan Cloutier

Ryan Cloutier

Direct and indirect effects of marine protection: Rockfish conservation areas as a case study

Ryan has worked on various conservation projects abroad in Australia and Indonesia. His current hobbies include freediving, volleyball and cycling. He will finish his MSc by Jan 2012 and hopes to continue working in the marine sciences.

Remi Daigle

Remi Daigle

Effects of larval swimming behaviour on the vertical and horizontal distribution patterns of marine invertebrate larvae

Originally from Moncton, NB, I finished me my BSc in Marine Biology at Dalhousie University. Before starting my PhD, I worked at the University of British Columbia/Bedford Institute of Oceanography on the invasion of the green crab (Carcinus maenas) on the west coast.

Cindy Dasilva

Cindy Dasilva

Dynamics of Picoplankton and the importance of the photosynthetic eukaryotic component in the North Atlantic Ocean

I studied biology in Laval University and moved to Nova Scotia on CCGS Hudson for sampling. I'm interested by the relation between diversity of picophytoplankton and climate changes.

Barbara de Moura-Neves

Barbara de Moura-Neves

Growth rates, habitat mapping and associated biodiversity of deep sea corals

I am in contact with corals since the first month of my undergraduate studies back in Brazil. I studied associated fauna of tropical corals during my undergraduate studies and octocoral taxonomy during my masters. My passion by marine biology made me want to go deeper and study deep-sea corals.

Cherisse Du Preez

Cherisse Du Preez

The relation between biodiversity and seafloor rugosity in deep-sea sponge and coral habitats

About me? Well my friends call me Cher; I’m slightly accident prone, have an accent nobody can place, my favourite colour is blue, but more importantly (and on topic) I am one of those lucky people living their dream. I work and play in the ocean: I’m a surfer, diver & underwater videographer; and when I’m “on the clock” my job is to explore & film the mysteries of the deep-sea.

Karen Filbee-Dexter

Karen Filbee-Dexter

Trophic coupling between kelp beds and adjacent deep-water communities

Originally from St. Margarets Bay, Nova Scotia I completed my BSc in Biology at Dalhousie University where I developed my interest in benthic ecology and coastal ecosystem dynamics.

Nathalie Forget

Nathalie Forget

Free-Living and Symbiotic Bacterial Communities in Contrasting Hydrothermally Active Habitats

I did my undergraduate studies at University of Quebec at Rimouski in marine biology, where I became interested in the ecology of extreme ecosystems and had the chance to do a summer internship with Dr. Kim Juniper, who is now my PhD director.

Maeva Gauthier

Maeva Gauthier

Quantifying the impact of bottom trawling on soft-bottom megafauna communities using video and scanning-sonar data on the continental slope off Vancouver Island, British Columbia

I studied biology in Montreal and moved to Victoria to study marine ecology. I had the opportunity to go to the Antarctic and the Arctic in 2009 for research and field course. My interests are related to coastal communities, global environmental issues, documentary filmmaking, outreach and many water activities, including diving, sailing, and surfing.

Adam Gobi

Adam Gobi

Automated Benthic Species Mapping using Intelligent Computer Vision

Combined the experience gained from a B.Eng. in Electrical Engineering and a M.Sc. in Artificial Intelligence into a Ph.D. in Ocean Engineering, concentrating on underwater robotics and machine vision. Recently assumed a role as lead camera engineer for James Cameron’s Deepsea Challenger submersible, which included a sixty-day expedition on the South Pacific Ocean to explore the deepest places on earth. Now back in Newfoundland setting up commercial R&D operations, continuing to fuel a passion for creating and deploying advanced technology for ocean exploration and protection.

Lu Guan

Lu Guan

Ichthyoplankton dynamics in the Strait of Georgia

B.Sc: Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China MA.Sc: Memorial University of Newfoundland My broad interests include marine ecology (particularly larval ecology), Fisheries oceanography

Janelle M. Hrycik

Janelle M. Hrycik

Estimating dispersion and connectivity: the biological null model

I am a PhD candidate in the Oceanography Department at Dalhousie University. I’m from Buffalo, New York, and I completed my Bachelor of Science honours degree in Marine Vertebrate Biology at Long Island University in May 2008. My graduate research utilizes a new technology that provides direct quantitative estimates of dispersion.

Jennifer Kelly

Jennifer Kelly

Fatty Acids as Dietary Tracers at the Base of Benthic Food Webs

Shin Hun Kim

Shin Hun Kim

Phylogeography and gene flow of blue mussel species in the Pacific & the North Atlantic Ocean

Phylogeography and population genetics using genetic markers Computational techniques: Bayesian, C, Perl, R, SQL Lab techniques: Sequencing, microsatellites

Stan King

Stan King

Exploring biodiversity and population genetics in species of Gyrodactylus infecting marine fishes: What can parasite DNA tell us?

Stanley spent his youth fly-fishing for trout and jigging cod in the waters of Nova Scotia. His fascination of fish led to a career commercially fishing and eventually studying them across North America.

Kira Krumhansl

Kira Krumhansl

Detrital Production in Kelp Beds

Myriam Lacharité

Myriam Lacharité

Patterns of sessile megafauna in the Atlantic Discovery Corridor – Relationship with substrate features

I completed my undergraduate degree in Biology in 2009 at McGill University. I have worked as a research assistant in an invasion ecology lab at McGill and at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. My interests include the ecology of aquatic invertebrates, and mathematical biology, in particular the study of biodiversity.

Marie-France Lavoie

Marie-France Lavoie

The influence of intertidal Manila clam (Venerupis philippinarum) aquaculture on biogeochemical fluxes

I did my BSc in biology (marine concentration) at the Université du Québec à Rimouski. During these studies, I developed a real interest for all the benthic world and especially for the aquaculture. A master study on the impacts of shellfish aquaculture is a great opportunity for me to work on what I’m interested!

Kara Layton

Kara Layton

Examining patterns of genetic variation in Canadian marine molluscs through DNA barcoding

I’ve always had a keen interest in marine science and received my BSc (Honours) in Marine and Freshwater Biology from the University of Guelph. I became interested in the applications of DNA barcoding after partaking in an Arctic Ecology field course in Churchill, Manitoba, Soon after I began graduate studies with Dr. Paul Hebert at the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario and had the opportunity to work with my favourite marine group- the Mollusca. Throughout both degrees I participated in field work in sub-Arctic, temperate and tropical locations and have had the opportunity to present my MSc research at both national and international conferences.

Jackie Lighten

Jackie Lighten

Exploring connectivity between Canada's three oceans: the past, present and future of trans-Arctic exchange

BSc (Hons) University of Southampton MSc Imperial College London & The British Natural History Museum My research interests fall mainly within the realm of systematics and population biology, with a keen enthusiasm for phylogeography.

Heike Link

Heike Link

Comparison of the functioning of benthic ‘hotspot’ vs ‘coldspot’ ecosystems in the Canadian Arctic

During my studies at Heidelberg University, Germany, I developed my interest for evolutionary ecology and marine invertebrates. I started working in benthic ecology with my Master’s Thesis (2006-2007) on the relation between diversity and stability in temperate hard-bottom communities in Chiba, Japan as part of the international field program GAME (Global Approach by Modular Experiments). The outcomes of this study motivated me to further investigate the role of functional diversity.

Michelle Lloyd

Michelle Lloyd

Patterns in the larval vertical distribution of marine benthic invertebrates in a shallow coastal embayment

I studied animal biology at Thompson Rivers University and Bamfield Marine Science Centre. After completing my BSc at Thompson Rivers University in 2005, I monitored commercial fisheries as an at-sea fisheries observer, taught marine and coastal ecology as a marine science educator, and maintained Northern abalone stocks and an abalone hatchery as a biologist and manager. In 2008, I moved from the west to the east coast of Canada to study biological oceanography at Dalhousie University. As a marine scientists and educator, I am interested in the conversation and sustainable development of marine environments.

Ian Luddington

Ian Luddington

Species diversity and community phylogeny of Arctic thalassiosiroid diatoms

I received my Bsc in biology from Mount Allison University in 2010 and returned after a year to start my Msc. During my undergrad I was very interested in the marine sciences and for an Honour’s project, worked on finding useful molecular signatures for marine dinoflagellate groups Prorocentrum and Ceratium.

Emmanuelle Medrinal

Emmanuelle Medrinal

Dynamics of resident and active pelagic marine protist communities.

I'm passionate about oceans since my teens. I got a Bsc in Biology (France-2007). During my Msc (Québec/ISMER & France -2009) I discovered Oceanography and fall in love with. I realized my Msc thesis project in Dr.Lovejoy's laboratory. I never left and now carring a Ph.D in oceanography. My areas of interest and fields of experience are microorganisms, microbial loop, link between microorganisms and ecosystem, primary production, phytoplankton ecophysiology and molecular biology.

Colleen Mercer-Clarke, PhD

Colleen Mercer-Clarke, PhD

Using landscape ecology to understand changing patterns of land use and its effects on the sustainability of coastal ecosystems

Colleen is an experienced marine ecologist (M. Sc. Memorial 1976) and landscape architect (M .L. Arch. Guelph, 1987), with over 30 years in private sector practice as an environmental consultant and senior project manager. Currently she is at work mobilizing scientific knowledge on climate change for use in improving our understanding of impacts to coastal environments and in mobilizing the adaptation planning of coastal communities in Canada and the Caribbean.

Jessica Nephin

Jessica Nephin

Distribution, abundance and congruence of benthic infauna and epifauna patterns on the Beaufort Shelf and Slope

I received my Bsc in ecology from UBC in 2009. After I graduated I worked in the Biological & Fisheries Oceanography laboratory at UBC where I gaining experience in both lab and field techniques in ocean research. I moved to Victoria and started my master’s work at the University of Victoria in 2011. My research focuses on Arctic benthic ecology and biodiversity baselines.

Eric Pedersen

Eric Pedersen

Ecological and evolutionary impacts of fluctuating dispersal in coastal metapopulations

I studied plant ecology at the University of Saskatchewan. I now work on measuring and modelling mechanisms and patterns of movement in marine life.

Geneviève Perrin

Geneviève Perrin

Utilisation des isotopes stables dans L'evaluation de L'orgigine des populations zooplanctoniques d'une aire marine protegee

After working in a veterinary clinic, the call of nature sent me back to school in Biology. During my undergrads in animal ecology, I’ve worked in forestry but I was missing the sea. Since I’m studying oceanography, I feel like home!

Adeline Piot

Adeline Piot

Impacts of biodiversity changes on ecosystem functioning in the intertidal zone

Ph.D thesis: 2012. Université du Québec à Rimouski (Canada) Impacts of biodiversity changes on ecosystem functioning in the intertidal zone M.Sc thesis: 2006. Université du Québec à Rimouski (Canada) Bioturbation and dinoflagellate kysts distribution in sediments B.Sc: 2004. Université de la Méditerranée (Marseille, France) Marine biology

Lara Puetz

Lara Puetz

Genetic diversity and geographical structure of deep sea hydrothermal vent tubeworms (Ridgeia piscesae) in fragmented habitats on the Endeavor segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge

I completed my BSc at Dalhousie University with First Class Honours in Marine Biology and Oceanography. While attending university I was presented with many amazing opportunities which included acoustically monitoring sperm whales, volunteering on a giant sea scallop farm, suturing salmon and spending a field season assisting in photographing and collecting genetic samples of pilot whales. Recently, I completed a six month CIDA internship as a fisheries research assistant in St Vincent and the Grenadines.

Adriana Radulovici

Adriana Radulovici

DNA barcoding of crustaceans across Canada’s oceans

I am interested in using molecular tools to study marine biodiversity at the species and genetic levels, mainly the genetic diversity and structure at various spatial scales.

Ashley Robar

Ashley Robar

Influence of benthic macrofauna on ecosystem functions

I’m a born and raised Nova Scotian. I received my BSc Honours at Mount Allison University (NB), where I studied macrofaunal community structure along the rocky intertidal of the Bay of Fundy. Throughout my masters, I’ve worked with several CHONe scientists and have traveled to many Canadian and International conferences.

Katleen Robert

Katleen Robert

Tools for studying variability in ecosystem services using seafloor cameras

I received a BSc in wildlife biology from McGill University where I studied topics ranging from canopy arthropod diversity to parrotfish feeding behaviour. During my MSc, I participated in many scientific cruises deploying cameras and collecting seafloor imagery. I am now pursuing a PhD at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton UK, on habitat mapping still using deep-sea benthic imagery.

Virginie Roy

Virginie Roy

Rôles des paramètres biogéophysiques structurant la biodiversité benthique de l'Arctique canadien à différentes échelles spatiales

Ph.D. Océanographie, 2010-present, UQAR-ISMER M.Sc. Sciences biologiques, 2008, Université de Montréal B.Sc. Spécialisé en sciences biologiques, 2005, Université de Montréal Research Interest Benthic ecology, biodiversity, seafloor topographic heterogeneity, spatial analyses, habitat mapping, Canadian Arctic.

Candice St. Germain

Candice St. Germain

Reproductive and physiological condition and juvenile recruitment in the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae Jones (Polychaeta: Siboglinidae) in the context of a highly variable habitat on Juan de Fuca Ridge

Dustin Schornagel

Dustin Schornagel

Fine-scale habitat use of age 1 Greenland cod (Gadus ogac) as revealed by acoustic telemetry

Originally from Saskatoon SK, I completed my BSc in Biology at the University of Victoria in 2010. My research interests are wide and include spatial ecology, population dynamics, habitat selection, and deep-sea invertebrate biology.

Annie Séguin

Annie Séguin

Effect of direct and indirect disturbances on biodiversity patterns and ecosystem functioning

2008 : B.Sc. Biology (Marine Sciences) Université du Québec à Rimouski 2008-Present: Ph.D. Oceanography (Fast-track) Université du Québec à Rimouski Interests : Benthic Ecology, Disturbance regimes, Biodiversity, Ecosystem functioning

Melanie Shapiera

Melanie Shapiera

Population Connectivity: Dispersal of Juvenile Cod

Born and raised in Ontario, Canada, I come from a freshwater ecology background. My undergraduate Honour’s thesis at Queen’s University was supervised by Dr. John Smol and had two chapters: 1. Calculating calcium content of littoral zooplankton (see Shapiera et al. 2011. Calcium content of littoral Cladocera in three softwater lakes of the Canadian Shield. Hydrobiologia, DOI: 10.1007/s10750-011-0824-z 2. Examining changes in zooplankton community structure over time with respect to changing calcium levels using paleolimnological methods. (in review)

Evgeniya Snauffer

Evgeniya Snauffer

Modeling herring and hake larval dispersal in the Salish Sea

Kevin Sorochan

Kevin Sorochan

Spatial and temporal patterns of decapod meroplankton in the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia

I owe much of my passion for marine science to honours research at the University of Victoria, coursework at Bamfield Marine Science Centre. I am interested in the mechanisms and consequences of interactions between organisms and their environment, and have developed a keen interest in marine larvae which I hope to pursue in further research opportunities.

Ryan Stanley

Ryan Stanley

Larval dispersal and population connectivity in American lobster

Hailing from the red shores of Prince Edward Island I have always had a connection with the sea. Whether snorkeling at the beaches in summer or hearing my grandfather’s stories of lobster hauls from yesteryear, the ocean has long been a big part of my life. I have been fortunate to peruse my passion for the ocean and fisheries through a joint honours degree in Aquatic resources and Biology at St. Francis Xavier University, followed by MSc. and PhD. programs at Memorial University of Newfoundland. During this time I have maintained a connection to the ocean and fisheries by working with a variety of commercially valuable species including snow crab, Atlantic cod, and American lobster.

Lina Marie Stolze

Lina Marie Stolze

Environmental Controls on Bioturbation Processes in Marine Benthic Habitats

2001-2007 study program “Marine Environmental Sciences” at the Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM), Oldenburg, Germany. Major subjects: Organic Geochemistry, Benthic Ecology. Diploma thesis: “Succession of Marine Fouling Communities – A Contribution to the Development of a Non-Toxic Antifouling”

Astrid Tempestini

Astrid Tempestini

Past and present connectivity between crustaceans’ population in the Arctic ocean.

I am fascinated by genetic and more precisely by evolution. I began to investigate the organisation of genetic diversity during my master thesis on tropical trees. For my PhD, I have abandoned trees for crustaceans because they are amazing creatures.

Emily Wilson

Emily Wilson

Patterns of biodiversity of marine birds and habitat use in the Gulf of Maine

I graduated with a degree in Biology at Colby College in Maine. I spent the following year researching birds at a tern and puffin colony in Maine, and a penguin colony in Argentina. I am interested in seabird conservation and behavioural ecology.

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