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Into the Unknown: Exploring Marine Life in Frontier Areas

By CHONe Student, Maeva 

Humans use the oceans in many different ways, directly (entertainment, food, transport materials) and indirectly (oxygen production, waste disposal). If we want to maintain the lifestyle that we have and continue using the ocean the way we have, we have to protect them. Sustainably managing the ocean is complicated problem. In the past we have focused on managing a few species. Now we recognize that an ecosystem approach is needed to sustainably management. However, an ecosystem approach requires a lot more information. The Canadian Healthy Oceans network is a university-government partnership dedicated to biodiversity science for the sustainability of Canada's three oceans. These ocean scientists are creating the knowledge for sustainable management of our oceans from the coast to the deep-sea, exploring marine life in frontier areas.

Watch Now in English or French, or Download full or small version

Video_LF36.jpgTraining Canada's Next Generation of Ocean Scientists

By CHONe Student, Cherisse Du Preez

This short documentary showcases CHONe's training of the next generation of ocean scientists. Meet several CHONe graduate students and see what ocean frontiers they dive into with their research. Fall in love with Canada's three oceans by viewing them through the eyes of CHONe's enthusiastic students and gain some appreciation for the advanced ocean exploration happening in Canadian waters.

Watch Now in English or French, Download English or French version

 

Learn about CHONe Scientists 

Video_LF55.jpgChatting with CHONe Student, Cherisse Du Preez

By CHONe Student, Cherisse Du Preez

Cherisse Du Preez, a PhD student from University of Victoria, shares her story on her research. Footage collected aboard the CCGS Hudson during the 2009 CHONe east coast cruise.

Watch Now in English 

Chatting with CHONe Student, Emily Wilson 

By CHONe Student, Cherisse Du Preez

Emily Wilson, a Masters student from Memorial University of Newfoundland shares her story on what opportunities CHONe has presented for her and where her project fits in the bigger context of the CHONe network. Footage collected aboard the CCGS Hudson during the 2009 CHONe east coast cruise.

Watch Now in English 

Video_LF43.jpgChatting with CHONe Student, Ashley Robar

By CHONe Student, Cherisse Du Preez

Ashley Rober, a Masters student from Memorial University, describes her CHONe research project and what CHONe has meant for her and her science. The interview was shot beside the CCGS Hudson, at the end of the 2009 CHONe cruise off the East coast of Canada.

Watch Now in English 

The camera won't eat you!

By CHONe Student, Mavea Gauthier

CHONe researchers telling their stories - highlights from the video workshop during the CHONe-COMPASS Training: Media and Science-to-Policy Workshop. 

Share your stories with us! Tell us - Who you are? What you do? Why is it important? and Why you love what you do? 

Watch Now

 

CHONe Scientists Conducting Research

Sampling for Larval Invertebrates in St. George’s Bay

By CHONe Student, Remi Daigle 

A timelapse video of Canadian Healthy Oceans Network (CHONe) students sampling for invertebrate larvae using a ring-net in St. George's Bay, NS, Canada.

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Video_LF117.jpgSampling for Larval Lobsters in St. George’s Bay, Nova Scotia

By CHONe Student, Remi Daigle 

A timelapse video of Canadian Healthy Oceans Network (CHONe) students sampling for lobster larvae using a neuston net in St. George's Bay, NS, Canada.

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VideoWeb_Phyto.jpg

Arctic Winter Phytoplankton: What are they and are they active? 

By CHONe Student, Emmanuelle Medrinal 

Phytoplankton respond to seasonal changes in irradiance and nutrient availability, and Arctic seasonal changes are more extreme than elsewhere, with complete absence of light for several months over winter. Read More

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VideoWeb_A12.jpgSampling in the Arctic

By CHONe Student, Emmanuelle Medrinal

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VideoWeb_A2.jpgBefore the Ice Melts: Marine Biodiversity in the Canadian Arctic

By CHONe Student, Maeva Gauthier 

Climate change is affecting many arctic species, not only polar bears. Decreasing sea ice cover has an impact on the phytoplankton, zooplankton and finally on the species living on the ocean floor, the benthos. Join our group of scientists on board the research icebreaker Amundsen as we sail through the Canadian Arctic, studying critical hot spots of biodiversity on the seafloor. This research is critical to establishing a baseline understanding of these biological communities, against which we can compare future changes and adaptations. Watch us on deck as we sample seafloor organisms down to 600 meters depth. Look over our shoulder during video surveys of the seabed with a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV). Discover live samples in the shipboard lab. The Arctic is one of the last frontiers on Earth for marine research and an environment that will be most affected by climate change. This video represents marine biodiversity research in the Arctic and was produced for Census of Marine Life Canada, and won Best Cinematography and Best Editing at the UVic Student Film Festival 2011. Thanks to CHONe, Census of Marine Life (CoML), ArcticNet, and the CCGS Amundsen.

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VideoWeb_A16.jpgSearching for Hot Spots under the Ice

By CHONe Student, Maeva Gauthier

Climate change is affecting many arctic species, not only polar bears. Decreasing sea ice cover has an impact on the phytoplankton, zooplankton and finally on the species living on the ocean floor, the benthos. Join our group of scientists on board the research icebreaker Amundsen as we sail through the Canadian Arctic, studying critical hot spots of biodiversity on the seafloor. This research is critical to establishing a baseline understanding of these biological communities, against which we can compare future changes and adaptations. Watch us on deck as we sample seafloor organisms down to 600 meters depth. Look over our shoulder during video surveys of the seabed with a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV). Discover live samples in the shipboard lab. The Arctic is one of the last frontiers on Earth for marine research and an environment that will be most affected by climate change. Thanks to CHONe, ArcticNet, and the CCGS Amundsen.

Watch Now

All CHONe videos viewable on the CanHealthyOceans YouTube Channel 


Other Videos

Video_Our Science.jpgThe ROVing Eye

By CHONe Student Cherisse Du Preez

This is a short documentary Zora and I produced as part of the Bamfield Marine Science Center Marine Filming-making course, summer 2009. It is about remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and their use in science. I (Cherisse) am working on my thesis in marine biology, where I study deep sea ecosystem. My work is solely made possible by the development and use of ROVs. ROVs stream back information and imagery to us of an alien world below the surface of the sea, unseen and unexplored before now.

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CHONeWeb_MarineBiodiversity3.jpgRevealing a hidden realm: Canada’s first marine biodiversity corridor

By the Centre for Marine Biodiversity

Watch Canadian researchers explore the Discovery Corridor, a swath of the Gulf of Maine that extends from the shallow coastal waters in the Bay of Fundy, over the northeast tip of Georges Bank and the Northeast Channel, and out to the New England Seamount Chain.

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CoML bookcover.pngA Census of the Ocean

Paul Snelgrove, TED Global, July 2011

Oceanographer Paul Snelgrove shares the results of a ten-year project with one goal: to take a census of all the life in the oceans. He shares amazing photos of some of the surprising finds of the Census of Marine Life.

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VideoWeb_Deepsea.jpgExploring the Ocean Frontiers - We Have More to Learn

Dr. Verena Tunnicliffe, Canada Ocean Lecture Series, 2 November 2010

The human species is limited by terrestrial adaptations and dependence on a few senses to understand our interactions with the environment. Penetration of the oceans by humans is difficult. Lack of visual connectivity beneath the sea surface usually means “out of sight, out of mind.” As part of the Canada Ocean Lecture Series, this presentation will explore some of the deep places in our ocean to reveal some unknown wonders. It will use pictures and film clips from expeditions to hot vents, subsea volcanoes, and deep into Canadian oceans to illustrate the beauty and the extraordinary dynamics of ecosystems that we never see. Canada is also a leader in development of subsea technologies that allow us to undertake such exploration: submersible, remotely operated vehicles and subsea observatories are world leading. We will also look to the role of new young scientists in dealing with the growing threats to the ocean. Communication and education is possibly the best approach to ensuring better stewardship of the oceans.

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VideoWeb_Earth.jpgCollaboration and Communication: Two Keys to Our Ocean's Future

Dr. John Nightingale, Canada Ocean Lecture Series, 5 December 2013

Canada is a very large country with a very modest population. As a result, the tax base available for the various government uses is also small, especially when spread across this vast land. No matter how anyone feels about the ideology of different government agencies, when it comes to ocean science, the fact remains that government cannot do it all, and that situation is getting worse. It is time for some innovation – time to find different models to expand the research, policy development and management of our oceans. As part of the Canada Ocean Lecture Series, this presentation will argue that the two keys to getting what everyone in the ocean science sector wants - more research, the development of better management tools, and more directed policies - are working differently through collaboration, and greatly improving public understanding through new kinds of communications efforts.

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